How Many Calories in Ahi Tuna? Decoding the Nutritional Facts

How Many Calories in Ahi Tuna? Decoding the Nutritional Facts

Ahi tuna, also known as yellowfin tuna, is a popular fish that is often consumed raw as sushi or sashimi. It is also commonly seared or grilled and served as a main dish. Ahi tuna is known for its mild flavor and firm, meaty texture, and it is a rich source of protein and essential nutrients. However, many people are curious about the calorie and nutrient content of ahi tuna. In this article, we will explore the nutritional facts of ahi tuna, including how many calories it contains and what other nutrients it provides.

What is Ahi Tuna?

Ahi tuna is a species of tuna that is native to the tropical and subtropical waters of the Pacific Ocean. It is also known as yellowfin tuna because of its distinctive yellow fins. Ahi tuna can grow up to 400 pounds, but most commonly weighs between 50 and 100 pounds. It is a popular fish for consumption because of its mild taste and versatility in cooking.

Nutritional Facts of Ahi Tuna

Ahi tuna is a nutrient-rich food that provides a range of essential vitamins and minerals. Below is a table outlining the nutritional content of a 4-ounce serving of raw ahi tuna:

Nutrient Amount per 4 oz serving
Calories 132
Protein 29g
Fat 1g
Saturated Fat 0g
Carbohydrates 0g
Fiber 0g
Sugar 0g
Sodium 50mg
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0%
Iron 4%

As you can see, a 4-ounce serving of raw ahi tuna contains only 132 calories, making it a low-calorie food that is ideal for people who are watching their weight. It is also a great source of protein, with 29 grams per serving. Ahi tuna is low in fat and contains no carbohydrates, fiber or sugar. It is also low in sodium, which makes it a heart-healthy food choice.

Sashimi vs. Cooked Ahi Tuna: Which Is Better?

Many people wonder whether they should eat their ahi tuna raw as sashimi or cooked. The answer depends on your personal preferences and health goals. Both raw and cooked ahi tuna have their own unique nutritional benefits.

Raw Ahi Tuna (Sashimi)

Raw ahi tuna is a popular choice for sushi and sashimi. It is best enjoyed when it is fresh and of high quality. Raw ahi tuna is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for brain and heart health. It is also high in protein and low in calories, making it an ideal food for weight loss and maintenance. However, raw ahi tuna is also high in mercury, which can be harmful if consumed in large quantities. If you enjoy eating raw ahi tuna, it is best to limit your consumption to once or twice a week.

Cooked Ahi Tuna

Cooked ahi tuna is a great source of lean protein and essential nutrients. Grilled or seared ahi tuna is a delicious and healthy main dish that can be enjoyed with a variety of sides. Cooked ahi tuna is lower in mercury than raw ahi tuna, which makes it a safer option for frequent consumption. However, cooking ahi tuna can cause some loss of nutrients, especially omega-3 fatty acids. To maximize your nutrient intake, try cooking your ahi tuna rare or medium rare.

Health Benefits of Ahi Tuna

Apart from being a low-calorie, high-protein food, ahi tuna has many health benefits that make it an ideal food to include in your diet. Here are some of the key health benefits of ahi tuna:

Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

As mentioned earlier, ahi tuna is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which have numerous health benefits. Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for brain and heart health and can help to reduce inflammation throughout the body. They have also been shown to improve mood and cognitive function.

Good Source of Vitamins and Minerals

Ahi tuna is a good source of many essential vitamins and minerals, including vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, and magnesium. These nutrients are important for maintaining good overall health and can help to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer.

Helps to Build and Repair Muscles

Ahi tuna is an excellent source of protein, which is important for building and repairing muscle tissue. Protein is also important for maintaining a healthy metabolism and can help to boost weight loss and improve body composition.

How to Incorporate Ahi Tuna into Your Diet

There are many ways to incorporate ahi tuna into your diet, depending on your preferences and cooking skills. Here are some ideas:

  • Raw as sushi or sashimi
  • Grilled, seared or roasted ahi tuna steak
  • Added to poke bowls or salads
  • Canned ahi tuna in salads or sandwiches
  • Served with vegetables and rice for a healthy main course

Conclusion

Ahi tuna is a delicious and nutritious fish that is rich in protein and essential nutrients. It is a low-calorie food that is ideal for people who are watching their weight, and it has many health benefits that make it an ideal food to include in your diet. Whether you prefer your ahi tuna raw or cooked, there are many ways to incorporate it into your diet and enjoy its unique taste and texture.

FAQs

  • How many calories in a 4-ounce serving of seared ahi tuna?
  • A 4-ounce serving of seared ahi tuna contains approximately 200 calories.

  • What is the nutritional value of ahi tuna?
  • A 4-ounce serving of raw ahi tuna contains 132 calories, 29g of protein, 1g of fat, 0g of saturated fat, 0g of carbohydrates, 0g of fiber, 0g of sugar, and 50mg of sodium.

  • Is ahi tuna good for weight loss?
  • Yes, ahi tuna is a low-calorie, high-protein food that is ideal for people who are watching their weight. It can help to promote weight loss and improve body composition.

  • How often can I eat raw ahi tuna?
  • Raw ahi tuna is high in mercury, which can be harmful if consumed in large quantities. It is best to limit your consumption to once or twice a week.

  • How can I tell if my ahi tuna is fresh?
  • Fresh ahi tuna should have a vibrant, deep red color with no brown spots or discoloration. It should also have a mild, slightly sweet smell. If your ahi tuna smells fishy or has a slimy texture, it is likely past its prime.

References:

1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ahi-tuna

2. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323108

3. https://www.seriouseats.com/how-to-buy-tuna-at-the-grocery-store

4. https://www.eatthis.com/ahi-tuna-nutrition-facts/

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