How Do You Spell Whom: A Guide to Perfect Grammar

How Do You Spell Whom: A Guide to Perfect Grammar

Have you ever written a sentence and wondered whether to use “who” or “whom”? Many native English speakers find this to be a common problem. The good news is that with a few simple rules, you can master the use of “whom” and improve your grammar. This article will guide you through the use of “whom”, explain the differences between “whom” and “who”, and provide you with tips on how to use “whom” correctly.

What is “Whom”?

“Whom” is an object pronoun that is used when referring to the object of a sentence.

Example:

Samantha saw the man whom she hired last week.

In this example, “whom” is used as the direct object of the sentence. “Whom” is used because it is referring to the man, who is the object of the verb “hired”.

What is the difference between “Who” and “Whom”?

“Who” is used when referring to the subject of a sentence, while “whom” is used when referring to the object. A subject is the person performing the action of the verb, while the object is the person or thing that is acted upon.

Examples:

Who is eating my sandwich?

Whom did you give the book to?

In the first example, “who” is used because it refers to the subject “who” is doing the action of eating the sandwich. In the second example, “whom” is used because it refers to the object “whom” the book was given to.

How to use “Whom” Correctly?

Now that you understand the basics of the difference between “who” and “whom”, let’s look at some tips on how to correctly use “whom”.

Tips:

  • Use “whom” when it is used as the object of the verb.
  • Remember that “who” is used for the subject of the sentence, while “whom” is used for the object.
  • When in doubt, rephrase the sentence to see if “he” or “him” sounds better. If “him” sounds better, use “whom”. If “he” sounds better, use “who”.

Common Mistakes with “Whom”

Here are some common mistakes people make when using “whom”.

Mistakes:

  • Using “who” instead of “whom”.
  • Using “whom” in a sentence where it is not the object of the verb.
  • Using “whom” when it is not necessary.

Examples of “Whom” in Context

Here are some examples of “whom” used correctly in sentences.

Sentence Correct Usage
My boss offered the promotion to the employee whom I recommended. “Whom” is used correctly as the object of the verb “recommended”.
Whom did you talk to at the party last night? “Whom” is used correctly as the object of the verb “talk to”.

When to Use “Who” Instead of “Whom”

While “whom” is used as the object of a sentence, “who” is used as the subject of a sentence. Here are some examples of when to use “who” instead of “whom”.

Examples:

  • Who is coming to the party tonight?
  • He is the one who wrote the book.
  • She is the one who won the prize.

Conclusion

“Whom” is an object pronoun that is used when referring to the object of a sentence. Remember that “who” is used for the subject of the sentence, while “whom” is used for the object. When in doubt, rephrase the sentence to see if “he” or “him” sounds better. If “him” sounds better, use “whom”. If “he” sounds better, use “who”. By following these rules, you can master the use of “whom” and improve your grammar.

Common Questions about “Whom”

  • Q: How do I know when to use “whom”?
  • A: Use “whom” when it is used as the object of the verb.

  • Q: What is the difference between “who” and “whom”?
  • A: “Who” is used when referring to the subject of a sentence, while “whom” is used when referring to the object.

  • Q: What are some common mistakes people make when using “whom”?
  • A: Some common mistakes include using “who” instead of “whom”, using “whom” in a sentence where it is not the object of the verb, and using “whom” when it is not necessary.

  • Q: When do I use “who” instead of “whom”?
  • A: Use “who” as the subject of a sentence.

References

  • Berkeley, Katie. 2019. Grammarly. “Who vs. Whom: Quick and Dirty Tips.”
  • Purdue Global Writing Lab. “Who vs. Whom.”

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